Episode 16: Vampire Diaries – Bad Boy Obsession, Fan Girl Confession

Welcome to Episode 16 of Fandom Cracked!  In today’s episode, your hosts talk bad boys. Damon Salvatore is your typical bad boy and would be the first to tell you he’s a bad influence. But the negative reach of Damon and the other male figures of Mystic Falls may be more insidious than they know.  Pebble and Blü look at the increasingly negative impact that male expectations have on today’s generation through the popular CW show, The Vampire Diaries.

And…just so you all know, this is our final episode of the season!  We’ll be back in August 2016!  Feel free to send us your ideas for season 2 episodes or give us feedback on season 1 using our handy dandy contact page.

Podcast Notes:

None.  At least we don’t think there are.  If there is a term we mentioned that you’re not sure about, please contact us and we’ll post an updated notes section with a definition of the word/phrase.

Episode 15: What do you Meme?

Welcome to Episode 15 of Fandom Cracked!  Today, your hosts discuss memes!  Listen to find out what a meme is and your hosts thoughts on the good, the funny, the bad, and the ugly of internet memes!

Podcast Notes:

  • Meme – an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture (Merriam-Webster)
  • Internet Meme – a video, image, gif, tweet (basically, practically anything that can exist on the internet) that gains popularity and spreads from person to person through the internet.
  • Richard Dawkins – a well-known and controversial evolutionary biologist and atheist who coined the term “meme.”

Episode 14: Tumblr Fumblr

Hi! Welcome to Episode 14 were we discuss social media platforms, specifically Blü’s favorite site Tumblr. Find out why Pebble finds Tumblr strange and confusing, and why Blü is upset with movie goers in this week’s “What the Frak Fandom.”

Podcast Notes:

  • Meme – a humorous image, text, video, or other form that is rapidly copied, sometimes changed slightly, and spread from person to person through the internet. Ex. Lolcats, Damn Daniel, or “I came out to have a good time, and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now” memes.
  • Mic drop – when someone makes a strong or impressive statement to mark the end of a conversation; getting the last word in.  Sometimes, only the speaker thinks they made an impressive “mic drop” worthy statement. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/mic-drop

 

Links to rating systems for comic books, T.V., and movies:

Episode 13: Fan Fiction, To Pair or Not to Pair

Welcome to Episode 13 of Fandom Cracked!  In today’s episode, your hosts discuss the complicated world of fan fiction pairings.  Specifically, we discuss the ethics of romantically pairing characters in fan fiction who, in canon, occupied the roles of abuser and survivor/victim.  Specific pairings we discuss are Sam Winchester and Lucifer (Supernatural), and Jessica Jones and Kilgrave (Jessica Jones).

Podcast Notes:

  • Canon – a plot point or fact that is sanctioned by the author or creator of an original work. For example, the series Buffy the Vampire Slayer ended it’s television production after season 7; however, Joss Whedon, the original creator, continued to work on “season 8” in the form of comics. These comics would be considered “canon” despite the 8th season of the show never making it to television.
  • Fan Fiction – a form of creative writing in which fans will sometimes engage. Works can range from complex, lengthy, or serious works to the fantastical, strange, and poorly written.
  • Pairing(s) – when two characters of a work are shipped (put into a relationship) together. Note: pairings and ships do not have to be canon. Ex. pairing Trish and Jessica from Jessica Jones in a relationship.
  • Reader Insert – Also known as “x reader,” where the author writes a story in which the reader can insert themselves into the text. Typically this is achieved by including “Y/N” or “Your Name” in the text so that readers can supplement their own name while reading.
  • Slash – a category of fan fiction that includes a homosexual pairing between two characters.

Episode 12: Fan Fiction, Legit or Illegal?

Welcome back to Fandom Cracked with Episode 12 and our look into the world of fan fiction. Is it fun? Yes. Is it legal? No one seems to know. Should it be legal? And are there ethical implications for fanfiction?  Find out on this episode where Pebble and Blü discuss the interesting world of fan fiction, what makes it fun, and why some creators of original works might not like it.

Podcast Notes:

  • Canon – a plot point or fact that is sanctioned by the author or creator of an original work. For example, the series Buffy the Vampire Slayer ended it’s television production after season 7; however, Joss Whedon, the original creator, continued to work on “season 8” in the form of comics. These comics would be considered “canon” despite the 8th season of the show never making it to television.
  • Fan Fiction – a form of creative writing in which fans will sometimes engage. Works can range from complex, lengthy, or serious works to the fantastical, strange, and poorly written.
  • Fluff – a category of fan fiction that includes romance and may be considered sweet.
  • Pairing(s) – when two characters of a work are shipped (put into a relationship) together. Note: pairings and ships do not have to be canon. Ex. pairing Trish and Jessica from Jessica Jones in a relationship.
  • Reader Insert – Also known as “x reader,” where the author writes a story in which the reader can insert themselves into the text. Typically this is achieved by including “Y/N” or “Your Name” in the text so that readers can supplement their own name while reading.
  • Slash – a category of fan fiction that includes a homosexual pairing between two characters.
  • Squee Factor – a situation or item that produces a feeling that induces the viewer/participant to make a high pitched noise of happiness or excitement.

 

Episode 11: From Buffy to Jessica Jones – Portrayals of DV in Media

Welcome to Episode 11 of Fandom Cracked!  In today’s episode, your hosts discuss how portrayals of domestic violence have evolved in pop culture, looking specifically at Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Jessica Jones, two shows that aired in two different decades, but are considered groundbreaking in how they portrayed women.

Podcast Notes:

  • Gaslighting – a form of mental abuse in which the abuser attempts to make the victim question their own sanity regarding the abuse.
  • Reproductive Coercion – a form of domestic violence in which the perpetrator of the abuse coerces, pressures, or threatens their partner’s reproductive health or reproductive decision making (e.g., whether or not to get pregnant) in order to maintain power and control in the relationship.

Episode 10: On the appeal of Star Wars…

Welcome to Episode 10 of Fandom Cracked!  In this episode, your hosts discuss the appeal of Star Wars.  Blü has been a life long fan and has her own theories on why Star Wars has such broad appeal!  Pebble, on the other hand, has always considered the enormous appeal of Star Wars to be a huge mystery as she never really got “into” the fandom.

Podcast Notes:

  • Reluctant Hero – An archetype of a hero.  The hero who doesn’t set out initially to be  hero, but, rather, reluctantly gets pulled into being the hero or into performing heroic acts.